CoSer

Marie Carol and COSER* unite to build a more equal society and to answer to a real problem, we believe in communities who will dare to tailor their development; therefore, throughout a communitarian process we designed and tailored bags which represent an opportunity.

PY

Description

Marie Carol and COSER* unite to build a more equal society and to answer to a real problem in which many women suffer in different communities, such as the case of 4 women who live in the cities of Luque and Limpio.
We started working with Patricia of Marie Carol by developing linen bags so that the hair salon could join this cause!
Marie Carol works with Davines and the brand encourages us to participate in this project which rewards social brands who work with the hair salon.
In COSER, we believe in communities who will dare to tailor their development; therefore, throughout a communitarian process we designed and tailored bags which represent an opportunity.
An opportunity to grow, an opportunity of having a decent workspace, an opportunity to generate incomes for a family, an opportunity to fix a street, a community.

COSER
Co, community
Ser*, I am with my community, I am with my own development and my community’s, I am with my work.
Edita, Felicia, Blanca and Ña Marta* are the soul of Coser.
The hands that are behind each bag seek to contribute with their families, with their communities and with their country.
Women who strive for an opportunity to be autonomic with their economy, by receiving a worthy remuneration which can cover the basic services and needs in accordance to health, education, among other things.
In the urban area (in some cases urban communities), almost a 27,3% belong to the category of a self-employed person and a 5,0% belong to the category of unpaid work. In the urban area, commerce sums up to a third of men and women. This sector is the first one for men and is followed by, almost the same relative importance, the community services (18,8%) and the industry (17,0%).
A high percentage of women which is declared labor “occupied” do not receive a fixed salary or is directly featured as an unpaid family worker. Women of the rural sector suffer more, for the lack of work security and by the culture which forces many young women to an enforced migration. This is stated in an investigation presented in the program “Paraguay Debate 2.0”.
This report belongs to a series of noted of the project “Paraguay Debate 2.0”, financed by the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) and the initiative Think Tank (ITT) throughout the Iniciativa Latinoamericana para la Investigación de Políticas Públicas (ILAIPP)*, con el Centro de Análisis y Difusión de la Economía Paraguaya (CADEP)*.

We are a community, we are Coser.
2 of every 10 Paraguayans work in an informal way
Human Development Reports
2013

We work in a Community* called El Peñon, located in the city of Limpio, from the Central Department of Paraguay.
We also work with Blanca Caceres’ workshop. Blanca, a woman who has been detained for 5 years, seeks to reintegrate herself and opens her own workshop for women who wish to reintegrate into the society. Blanca is a woman who may have chosen another path. However, she decided to better herself and took sewing classes while she was in prison. Once she could leave the “Buen Pastor” (the prison for women in Paraguay), she studied working in a workshop and then managed to open her own!
Coser aims to empower women who are currently working in an informal way and who live in extreme situations. These could be financial, community or situations in their house, among other things.
Coser aims to work in a collaborative way with the seamstresses involving them from the cost to the design of each product.
Both workshops are in alarming conditions in terms of occupational security, in other words, both workshops are not adequate for a work space because of the refrigeration, the lighting, the size, among other things.
That is why we have as priority this year, to build a workshop in the community since the current workshop takes place in the precarious house of one of the citizens of El Peñon.
As Coser, we join the movement which invites consumers to ask themselves #WhoMadeMyClothe in order to inspect the work of the people who are behind each clothe.
Our campaign consists in placing the name of the women in each bag we produce.
(Done by Blanca Caceres)

*Translator’s Note (1): The word in Spanish “coser” is the verb: to sew.
*Translator’s Note (2): The word in Spanish “ser” is the verb: to be.
*Translator’s Note (3): The “Ña” in “Ña Marta” is an abbreviated word for “doña” which refers to a woman such as “Ma’am, Miss” but in a more friendly and affectionate way.
*Translator’s Note (4): Latin-American Initiative for Research of Public Policies
*Translator’s Note (5): Center of Analysis and Diffusion of the Paraguayan Economy
*Translator’s Note (6): These communities in Spanish are called “asentamiento”, which are small cities or villages with most of the citizens living in poverty or extreme poverty.

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